Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Find out about August's Birthstone here!



I have a fascination with birthstones and August's even more so as it is one of three months 
in our calendar that have not one - but THREE gemstones! They are: The Peridot, the Sardonyx, and the Spinel. 
August did not always have three birthstones, in fact, the other two were only added in 2016, because...well, why not! But seriously, each stone is represented by certain qualities that align with each birth month and as more and more precious stones come into being, I expect that you will see more birth months being associated with more than one stone.
But isn't that the fun of it? If you don't like one...well now you have a couple more to choose from!

For the sake of time and space, this year we will concentrate on the Peridot. 

BIRTHSTONE FACTS & FOLKLORE
Peridot has been found in volcanic lava in Hawaii and in meteorites that have fallen to Earth. 
It was once believed that the green peridot crystals found in volcanic ashes were the tears of the volcano goddess, Pele. 

In the 1700s, a meteorite that landed in Siberia contained many Peridot crystals that were large enough to be used for jewelry.
When set in gold, this gem was said to protect the wearer from nightmares. 
Peridot is believed to help depression. If you dream that you find a Peridot while digging in the garden, you will have an unexpected visitor.

Though peridot is widely recognized by its brilliant lime green glow, the origin of this gem’s name is unclear. Most scholars agree that the word “peridot” is derived from the Arabic faridat which means “gem,” but some believe it’s rooted in the Greek word peridona, meaning “giving plenty.” Perhaps that’s why peridot is associated with prosperity and good fortune. 

Peridot is the rare gem-quality variety of the common mineral olivine, which forms deep inside the earth’s mantle and is brought to the surface by volcanoes. Rarely, peridot is also found inside meteorites. 

Peridot’s signature green color comes from the composition of the mineral itself—rather than from trace impurities, as with many gems. That’s why this is one of few stones that only comes in one color, though shades may vary from yellowish-green to olive to brownish-green, depending how much iron is present.

Most of the world’s peridot supply comes from the San Carlos Reservation in Arizona. Other sources are China, Myanmar, Pakistan and Africa.

Peridot only measures 6.5 to 7 on the Mohs scale, so while the raw crystal is prone to cracking during cutting, the finished gemstones are fairly robust and easy to wear.

Also known as “the Evening Emerald” because its sparkling green hue looks brilliant any time of day, peridot is said to possess healing properties that protect against nightmares and evil, ensuring peace and happiness. Babies born in August are lucky to be guarded by peridot’s good fortune.

Peridot jewelry dates back as far as the second millennium BC. These ancient Egyptian gems came from deposits on a small volcanic island in the Red Sea called Topazios, now known as St. John’s Island or Zabargad.

Ancient Egyptians called peridot the “gem of the sun,” believing it protected its wearer from terrors of the night. Egyptian priests believed that it harnessed the power of nature, and used goblets encrusted with it to commune with their nature gods.

Some historians believe that Cleopatra’s famed emerald collection may have actually been peridot. Through medieval times, people continued to confuse these two green gems. The 200-carat gems adorning one of the shrines in Germany’s Cologne Cathedral were long believed to be emeralds as well, but they are also peridots.
Peridot colored Seaglass

This gemstone saw a revival in the 1990s when new deposits were discovered in Pakistan, producing some of the finest peridots ever found. Some of these “Kashmir peridots” measured more than 100 carats.

The most productive peridot deposit in the world is located on the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona. An estimated 80 to 95 percent of the world’s peridot supply is found here. 


Thanks to these rich deposits, the modern demand for Peridots can now be met easily, giving people born in August affordable options for wearing this beautiful green birthstone.

If you are not into gem stones per se hop on over to Handmade Jewelry Haven's website to see some beautiful green peridot colored alternatives to wear!
source; The Farmers Almanac; The American Gemstone Society




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19 comments:

  1. Beautiful stones. And is that beaded kumihimo on the seaglass pendant?

    Robin
    Rusty Ring: Reflections of an Old-Timey Hermit

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  2. I'm not really a gem stone person, but I can't help but fall in love with those colours!

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    1. It is really amazing...as I thought for all these years that the Emerald was August's birthstone.
      Guess you never stop learning!

      - Lisa

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  3. Interesting facts!Stones are something that I know very little about.

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    1. One of my personal mantras is that you are never too old to learn, as I myself can attest to!

      Thanks for stopping by!

      - Lisa

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  4. Interesting post about birthstones. I love green a lot. And the green of peridot is amazing!
    Thank you for sharing these ideas!
    Have a nice day!

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  5. I love to hear about stones. Thanks for sharing this awesome information on the Peridot..

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    1. It's kinda neat to learn something new, especially about something so pretty :)

      - Lisa

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  6. I love folk lore stores, and just the other day I got some stones to add to my wand.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Waiting anxiously to see the finished project!

      - Lisa

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  7. Such a beautiful stone. Lovely colour. Thanks for sharing at The Wednesday Blog Hop :)

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  8. Interesting post! A beautiful stone!

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  9. Ya know I thought it was something easier to remember but I sure do love that color green.

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    1. I always thought it was an Emerald! Shows you what I know...lol.

      - Lisa

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  10. I was born in August and I find this absolutely fascinating I can always learn something new on here and impress all my beaders out there thanks for giving me pro tips and making my week so much more special!!!

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