Monday, September 17, 2018

Monday, September 10, 2018

2018 North American Sea Glass Festival



As you all know one of my passions is Seaglass and the 2018 North American Sea Glass Festival will be held in Wildwood, New Jersey on Saturday, October 27, 2018 & Sunday, October 28, 2018.   

Here are the details:

13th Annual North American Sea Glass Festival  
Wildwood Convention Center
Saturday, October 27, 2018, 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 
Sunday, October 28, 2018, 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

The Wildwood Convention Center is located on the beach, has ample parking, and is a beautiful facility.   The City of Wildwood is conveniently located close to several area attractions, including Cape May, which makes it a great destination for sea glass lovers. 

More details coming soon!  Stay posted on the Seaglass Association Facebook page and
website.


Festival Schedule is as follows:

Saturday, October 27, 2018
9:30 a.m.       Ticket counter opens
10:00 a.m.     Festival Opens  –
Purchase Shard of the Year cards all day
11:30 a.m.     Beach Marble History in Wildwood, New Jersey and Beyond 
                      – Doug Watson & Mary McCarthy
2:00 p.m.      Bottle Bottoms, Lips, and More – Richard LaMotte
5:00 p.m.      Festival Closes

Sunday, October 28, 2018
9:30 a.m.      Ticket Counter Opens
10:00 a.m.    Festival Opens 
11:30 a.m.     Sea Glass Sourcing: Beaches Known to Relinquish Specific Finds 
                      – Ellie Mercier
2:00 p.m.      Hurricane Maria: Renewal, Hope and the Love of Sea Glass 
                      – Carolyn Pigford
3:00 p.m.       Shard of the Year Contest Winner Announcements Begin

4:00 p.m.      Festival Closes

Interested in Volunteering?  Click here for more information. 

For more information visit  www.seaglassassociation.org 

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Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Need a gift for September? Learn about September's Birthstone here...



Although sapphire typically refers to the rich blue gemstone variety of the mineral corundum, this royal gem actually occurs in a rainbow of hues. Sapphires come in every color except red, which earn the classification of rubies instead.

The name “sapphire” comes from the Latin sapphirus and Greek sappheiros meaning “blue stone,” though those words may have originally referred to lapis lazuli. Some believe it originated from the Sanskrit word sanipriya which meant “dear to Saturn.”

Sapphires are found in India, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Sri Lanka, China, Australia, Brazil, Africa and North America (mainly Montana). Their origin can affect their value as much as color, cut, clarity and carat size.

Sapphires symbolize loyalty, nobility, sincerity and integrity. They are associated with focusing the mind, maintaining self-discipline and channeling higher powers.

September’s birthstone, the sapphire, has been popular since the Middle Ages. Back then, the celestial blue color of this gem symbolized heaven and attracted divine favor and wise judgment.

Greeks wore sapphire for guidance when seeking answers from the oracle. Buddhists believed it brought spiritual enlightenment, and Hindus used it during worship. Early Christian kings cherished sapphire’s powers of protection by using it in ecclesiastical rings.

Ancient Hebrews believed that the Ten Commandments were engraved on tablets of sapphire, though historians now believe the blue stone referenced in the Bible may have been lapis lazuli.

This gem became a symbol of royal love in 1981 when Britain’s Prince Charles gave Lady Diana a 12-carat blue sapphire engagement ring. Prince William later gave this ring to Catherine Middleton when he proposed in 2010.

Today, top-quality blue sapphire remains one of Mother Nature's rare gems.

Of course...if you prefer Seaglass to to Sapphires come see our Cobalt Blue Seaglass Necklace...a 'one of a kind' find indeed!

Cobalt Seaglass Necklace

Need a gift for a someone born in September? 

Click here to get your free September Gift Guide!

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Monday, September 3, 2018

What Labor Day Was Intended For!



Labor Day is a U.S. national holiday held the first Monday every September. Unlike most U.S. holidays, it is a strange celebration without rituals, except for shopping and barbecuing. For most people it simply marks the last weekend of summer and the start of the school year.

The holiday’s founders in the late 1800s envisioned something very different from what the day has become. The founders were looking for two things: a means of unifying union workers and a reduction in work time.

Labor Day came about because workers felt they were spending too many hours and days on the job.

The first Labor Day was hardly a national holiday. Workers had to strike to celebrate it.

In the 1830s, manufacturing workers were putting in 70-hour weeks on average. Sixty years later, in 1890, hours of work had dropped, although the average manufacturing worker still toiled in a factory 60 hours a week.

These long working hours caused many union organizers to focus on winning a shorter eight-hour work day. They also focused on getting workers more days off, such as the Labor Day holiday, and reducing the workweek to just six days.

These early organizers clearly won since the most recent data show that the average person working in manufacturing is employed for a bit over 40 hours a week and most people work only five days a week.

Surprisingly, many politicians and business owners were actually in favor of giving workers more time off. That’s because workers who had no free time were not able to spend their wages on traveling, entertainment or dining out.

As the U.S. economy expanded beyond farming and basic manufacturing in the late 1800s and early 1900s, it became important for businesses to find consumers interested in buying the products and services being produced in ever greater amounts. Shortening the work week was one way of turning the working class into the consuming class.

So, remember to stop by Handmade Jewelry Haven...because when you purchase something from a small business, you are TRULY celebrating the spirit of Labor Day!
Excerpt from: The Conversion 
Green Victorian Shell Necklace

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Monday, August 27, 2018

Cleaning Jewelry (Psst! there is a freebie in here!!)



I frequently get asked what the best way to keep jewelry clean. The absolute best way to do it is to use a jewelry cloth treated with cleaning solution and rub!  The trick is not to rub hard, but to rub a lot. People sometimes make the mistake of pulling their chains through the cloth too hard and BOOM! The chain breaks! You really just need a firm but gentle pressure...not too hard. 
If you don't have a Jewelry Cleaning cloth, you can just use a clean piece of cotton cloth to rub, however for really tarnished jewelry, I would recommend the Jewelry Cleaning cloth.

To see a demo on the correct way to clean your jewelry, check out our brief JEWELRY CLEANING TUTORIAL on YouTube!

For intricate rings, I stumbled across this GREAT DIY method of getting them clean.

You will need:

Small bowl
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon baking soda
1 teaspoon dish detergent
1 cup hot water
Aluminum foil
Paper towel
Old toothbrush

Gather what you need for making the jewelry cleaner. You can use your favorite dish detergent — or make your own — to add a serious grease-busting aspect to this concoction. The salt, baking soda, and aluminum foil create a chemical exchange called an ion transfer, which naturally cleans metals.


Line the bowl with a square of aluminum foil, and then top with the salt, baking soda, and dish detergent. Now add the hot water and watch as the liquid fizzes. Drop in your jewelry and let sit in the cleaner for 10 minutes.

Remove your jewelry and use the toothbrush to gently scrub around any prongs, groves in the jewelry, or gemstones. We tested this cleaner on gold, silver, sterling, diamonds, and other gems with glittering results. Rinse after cleaning, and pat dry.


You'll love how your jewelry sparkles after the quick cleaning, which is safe to do over and over.
(source:Popsugar)

Would you like a FREE Jewelry Cleaning Cloth? We will send you one! 
(US residents only - please)
Just fill out the form below.

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Monday, August 20, 2018

Fishing Floats made of glass??!!



I have to tell you that one of my all time favorite things EVER are Japanese Glass Fishing floats. If you've ever been to one of those old timey, kitschy, seafood restaurants, you've surely seen them either hanging from the walls or decorating some lonely corner. 
My best friend Kathys dad was a boat captain (like my dad), but their house was always decorated with everything nautical, and I loved it!

They were once used by fishermen in many parts of the world to
keep their fishing nets, as well as longlines or droplines afloat. 
Large groups of fishnets were strung together, sometimes up to 50 miles long, and were set adrift in the ocean and supported near the surface by hollow glass balls or cylinders containing air to give them buoyancy. These glass floats are no longer used by fishermen, but many of them are still afloat in the world's oceans, primarily the Pacific. They have become a popular collectors' item for beachcombers and decorators.


Surprisingly it was a Norwegian, Christopher Faye, that was credited for the invention in 1840. The Japanese started using them around 1910. Today, most of the remaining glass floats originated in Japan because it had a large deep sea fishing industry which made extensive use of the floats. 
Today most are replicas that are used in nautical or coastal
interiors, however, if you are lucky, you can still find one on a pacific beach!

Fishing Float Earrings

You can always pick up a pair at Handmade Jewelry Haven to dangle from your earlobes!
I make these using the glass ball found inside Japanese soda bottles, also known as a Codd Neck bottle!

source: Wikipedia





Feeling adventurous? I have a free download on how you can make your own Japanese Fishing Float!

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Monday, August 13, 2018

Wordless Wednesday - Cool Beach Finds!



Here is just a little teaser for next weeks post! Enjoy!









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